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Why is Magnesium so Important?

Why is Magnesium so Important?

Magnesium is an essential mineral requires for over 300 chemical reactions in the body. Its functions as an electrolyte supporting energy production, muscle contraction, our bone structure and nervous system.

As you can tell its pretty important to maintain optimum levels of magnesium in our body. Many unprocessed foods would be considered a good source of magnesium, these include:

  • Green leafy vegetables
  • Banana
  • Cacao
  • Avocado
  • Legumes
  • Lentils
  • Nuts and seeds

However in todays modern age people are opting for more processed and refined foods containing less of this essential mineral. For those of you thinking I eat these foods all the time why might I need magnesium?

Due to modern day farming methods and food processing our soil quality is depleted of many minerals, making it harder for our nervous system to work efficiently. This combined with todays busy lifestyles,  stressful working hours and constant stimulation from electronic devices leaves many of us depleted.

You may be experience some of the common symptoms of magnesium deficiency:

  • Muscle cramps and twitching
  • Fatigue
  • Headaches / migraines
  • Irritability / PMS
  • Low mood / anxiety
  • Insomnia
  • Constipation

The Australian government has the following guidelines for daily magnesium intake

Gender

Age group

Requirement

 

0-12 months

75/mg

 

1-3

80/mg

 

4-8

130/mg

 

9-13

240/mg

Male

14-18

410/mg

Female

14-18

360/mg

Male

19 +

420/mg

Female

19 +

320/mg

Pregnancy

 

400/mg

Lactation

 

360/mg

 

 

Here at the compounding pharmacy we have a wide a range of Magnesium available from Epsom salts, topical sprays, creams, capsules, powders and of course Kim’s famous magnesium glycinate 

If you are considering supplementing with magnesium feel free to check with our friendly staff at Darlinghurst or Mosman to see what option is best for you.

 

References:

https://www.nrv.gov.au/nutrients/magnesium

https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11104-013-1781-2

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4455825/


 

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